Tag Archives: poc

oh, tiger beatdown!

Basically, this movie seems very much like some guy – let us call him, for legal reasons, “Phlames Phlameron” – sat down and was like, “well, I like Star Wars. And I like masturbating to old copies of National Geographic. If only there were some way for me to combine these interests!”

Reasons I Laughed Out Loud, Offending Several Fellow Patrons, During The Major Motion Picture “Avatar.” @ Tiger Beatdown

“Avatar really did look like a Lisa Frank binder had sex with a mid-’80s sci-fi paperback cover and their baby threw up on your face, which was great.”

links from livejournal!

As a general rule, the links I bring to you come to me via (a) someone on livejournal or (b) Google reader, in that order of frequency. (The exception would be the links that my ex-bf sends to me… although I don’t know if I’ve actually put up any of them on the blog yet. Hi, ex-bf!)

sutlers discusses criticism of Avatar and the denial of native cultures’ agency in popular media. (See also: When Will White People Stop Making Movies Like Avatar? A question to which we’d all like to know the answer.)

gabrielleabelle‘s Sunday Link Posts are a great resource for current discussion about rape in the media and blogosphere. A highlight from this week’s update is What Part of No Do You Still Not Understand? Date Rape in the time of Kobe, roofies, and Girls Gone Wild, a surprisingly level-headed discussion of date rape in a major news publication (LA Weekly). I am so sad that I just typed that. Good breakdown of the Koss study and more recent corroborating research, although bad dismissal of male survivors. :/

rm updates frequently with links that are moderately random but always interesting: topics include but are not limited to fandom, glbt issues, sexism, racism, representation of women in the media, infuriating things in the NYT (often a subsection of the previous topics), and Torchwood. She is a writer, actor, independent scholar, and professional badass, so I doubly recommend her journal.

– Not exactly political but brought a huge smile to my face: Things I Learned From Holly by theuglyvolvo. Truly lovely, rich piece about pomegranates and the process of peeling them. Also, life, you know, that stuff. Tragically standard warnings about heteronormativity apply.

– Now I want to write a poem that rhymes “heteronormativity” with “nativity.” Sadly, that is beyond the scope of this blog post. (Or maybe a rap number? Does one of y’all DJ? Perhaps we should ask Victor…)


I’m having one of those weeks where I keep visualizing cases and correspondingly have a burning need to use prepositions correctly. Lingua latina, meos soxores non roxaris. (Were you aware that “r0x0r” is a deponent verb? Well… it is now.)


Further posts of substance may have to wait until after Christmas, but of course now that I’ve said that I’ll end up posting something anyway. EITHER WAY… if you’re celebrating a holiday now, I wish you a lovely one!

link round-up

I’m in the middle of writing two other posts (the unbearable fatness of being/FWD post FINALLY FOR REALSIES), but a ton of cool links showed up on my radar today:

James Chartrand’s Constructed Masculinity Goes Far Beyond the Pen Name. Great coverage of the freelancing Bronte of our times and related Sexism Yay.

Marginalized folks shouldn’t always have to be “the bigger persons.” I am sad that this needs saying. But, hell yes, OP.

Ghosts of Shopping Past. Decaying malls! Consumerism thwarted and defied by nature! Longtime peeps know that I am all about the urban decay. And not just the makeup line. One of my favorite urbex/urban decay photographers is Rana X.

Readability is an AWESOME script that simplifies webpages and makes them much easier to read. Amazing accessibility tool. Certain fanfic websites, you will now be way easier on the ol’ eyes.

come with us now, if you will, gentle readers

So, I mention occasionally in this blog (and a lot more, in meatspace) that I spend a lot of time in Buffy fandom. Sometimes, this is greeted with “how totally cool, please link me up to your hot Spike/Buffy fanfic,” but more often, with bemused tolerance, and occasionally, rolled eyes. I actually suspect that more eyerolling goes on behind my back, but, you know, that’s ok. The point of this post is not the true love of Spike and Buffy (or Kirk and Spock, or Harry and Draco…). Rather, it’s transformative works. Although fanfiction is more what I do (since 1999, yo), this post largely focuses on vidding because it has a very interesting history and I think it’s more accessible to the outlander, if you will.

What is a transformative work? Well, I will give you the definition that the Organization for Transformative Works has in its FAQ, which I think is an excellent one:

A transformative work takes something extant and turns it into something with a new purpose, sensibility, or mode of expression.
Transformative works include but are not limited to fanfiction, real person fiction, fan vids, and fan art. The OTW is interested in all kinds of transformative works, but our priority will be to support and defend the types of works hosted in our archive, and the fans who create them. […]
The term transformative was specifically chosen to highlight in the nonprofit organization’s name one of the key legal defenses for fanworks of all kinds (including real person fiction): that they are transformative of original source materials.
A transformative use is one that, in the words of the U.S. Supreme Court, “adds something new, with a further purpose or different character, altering the source with new expression, meaning, or message.” A story from Voldemort’s perspective is transformative, so is a story about a pop star that illustrates something about current attitudes toward celebrity or sexuality.

andrew in buffy 7x16 storyteller

So, my gentle readers, you may be going, “why do I care about this” and/or “is this remotely related to feminism” and/or “is this remotely related to life,” but trust me, I am going somewhere with this.

Did you know that the 90% of fic writers publishing in Star Trek zines in 1973 were female? Star Trek is considered the foundation of contemporary fandom, and also the origin of vidding culture. In the early 1980s, female vidding collectives sprung up to meet the needs of early vid makers. Collaborative effort was necessary due to the time-intensive and cost-prohibitive nature of vidding in the early days of the VCR.

Check out “Women, Star Trek, and the early development of fannish vidding” by Francesca Coppa.

It’s not just Star Trek. Fan culture at large is not disproportionately female. But the culture surrounding fanworks, and the creators of fan works, has historically been female-driven and women-populated. (I am aware that this is not always the case these days – anime vidding fandoms? Might be dude heavy? But my point stands.) There’s even a TV Tropes page, because we all know that TV Tropes is the true arbiter of truths on the internet: Most Fanfic Writers Are Girls.

Why do women create fan works? Back to all that “transformative works” stuff. Women are challenging, editing, and changing popular culture because we’re not satisfied with it. Fanfiction and vidding are both fertile grounds for textual de- and re-construction, and for expressions of female desire. They’re also both powerful mediums for feminist critique. As someone who literally grew up in fandom (I started reading and writing Daria fanfiction when I was 12 – yes, I’m a little embarrassed), the strong, nurturing, and largely female community I found in fandom has been a huge part of my life. I met my best friend through fandom in 2001 – through her, I discovered and decided to attend [that place where I went to undergrad]. Every time I go to a new city, there’s someone I know and want to meet up with there. Nimbus 2003 was the summer before my junior year of high school. (And here I am Nimbus. Yeah… no explanations for that one.)

So, transformative works? Important.

If you are curious about vidding as feminist critique, here are a few vids you might check out:
She Walks by jmtorres (Dollhouse). Meta on rape culture; I just linked to it in my previous post.
Bachelorette by obsessive24 (Buffy the Vampire Slayer). Patriarchy in the Buffyverse. This video also showcases the epic racefail that is Joss Whedon, so forewarned is forearmed.
Origin Stories by giandujakiss (Buffy the Vampire Slayer). “It’s Nikki Wood’s fucking coat.” Criticism of the series’ handling of Spike and related epic racefail.

…the title links the vid to Donna Haraway’s feminist, antiracist critique of Western civilization’s origin stories in Simians, Cyborgs, and Women, much of which is based on a close reading of Octavia Butler’s Xenogenesis trilogy; because superheroes have origin stories,and Slayers are superheroes, and so is Robin Wood; because the plural in the title makes you think, “Whose origin? Whose story?”; because there isn’t just one story, ever. Because I wanted to say, “Pay attention to whose stories don’t get told.”

ETA: Piece of Me by obsessive24 (Britney Spears) is a great example of a vid about celebrity culture working with non-narrative footage. obsessive24 is one of my favorite vidders, and her work is generally excellent – this is no exception. 🙂

topics for after finals are done consuming my soul and thoughts about writing

Predictably, whenever there are a billion other things I should be doing, I have tons of things I want to write about. I will make a list here so I can come back to it when I am overcome by post-finals turkey-induced ennui.

– women/women of color/poc in sci-fi (I know Joy wants to read this!)
– (un)hottest things ever (also known as, when boys call me “smart” as a compliment instead of actually engaging in an intelligent conversation with me, I know they only want in my pants. on the other hand — )
– when old dudes won’t SHUT THE FUCK UP and talk even when they know nothing in group situations (church book club/buffy discussion group, for example) and how I do not know how to deal with that aside from raising my voice in a manner in which I feel is rude. On the bright side, book club is at MY place next month, and I am going to make everybody hold the stick when they talk. NO ONE talks without holding the stick. Because apparently, we are in preschool.

One thing I do want to say before I forget about it: I was helping the ex-boyfriend through several revisions of his NSF application over the course of the week, and I made many a note in the margins. (I only discovered Track Changes in MS Word this year, and can I just say, it is my FAVORITE THING EVER?????) Anyway, he had a lot of sentences where I was like “there is no reason for these words to be this big” or “ACTIVE VERBS” or “you are an engineer, stop using the word ‘green,’ this is not Real Simple, ok.” Admittedly, the last issue is not germane to this discussion.

He pointed out that these things are easier for me, because I write all the time. To which I was like, “really?” Because, in my head, I only count my fiction when I think about writing. If it’s a not a story, it’s not really writing, in my book. However, I do write in my online journal all the time. Sometimes, multiple times a day, even if it’s just to say, this icon is the best icon ever (made by timewaslost @ LJ):

Also, I write a lot of papers.

I am generally reluctant to call myself a writer, because I always feel like everything I write is too short and TRAGICALLY UN-EPIC. However, this realization makes me happy and filled with the joy of the Medusa. Or something. 😉

This is why the internet is great. (See: Here Comes Everybody by Clay Shirky, which you should read.) WE CAN ALL BE WRITERS. HINT HINT HINT, my feminist theory compatriots! 😉

tonight’s class, unrelated things

I was really tired tonight and bleaaaaaaaah because of my cold, and I don’t think I had any coherent comments I could have made that I didn’t. I was also quiet tonight because, frankly, the topics we touched on are very triggering for me.


Cyborgs: still a BAD METAPHOR. Moving on now…


Lastly – I do in fact write things that are not Buffy-related. If you’re interested in my original fiction, a short story that I wrote for Imaginary Beasts #15 is available in the IB archive here: gloves. The text is all by me, but the illustrations were done by coffeebased @ LJ, whose art I love. And yes, I do go by yet another name on the internets. I think three is my limit. I am maxed out. (But if you’re curious about what my tattoo says, now you know!)

great article from my friend katie

depaul folk: go here to log in to Project Muse; if you search for the title, it comes right up.

“Being Lovingly, Knowingly Ignorant: White Feminism and Women of Color”
Mariana Ortega

The aim of this essay is to analyze the notion of “loving, knowing ignorance,” a type of “arrogant perception” that produces ignorance about women of color and their work at the same time that it proclaims to have both knowledge about and loving perception toward them. The first part discusses Marilyn Frye’s accounts of “arrogant” as well as of “loving” perception and presents an explanation of “loving, knowing ignorance.” The second part discusses the work of Audre Lorde, Elizabeth Spelman, and María Lugones in their attempts to deal with the issue of arrogant perception within feminism, and examines how Lugones’s notion of “‘world’-traveling” may help us deal with “loving, knowing ignorance.” Ultimately, the author suggests that we need to become aware of instances of “loving, knowing ignorance,” especially if we are to stay true to Third Wave feminism’s commitment to diversity.